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Social Security Disability for ADHD

An inability to focus and complete actions is a chronic neuropsychiatric condition known as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. There are two types of this medical condition: one occurs in children, and one occurs in adults and is accompanied by restlessness and impulsive behavior.

This condition can cause a wide range of symptoms from mild to severe, all of which may impact the ability of an individual to perform a substantial gainful activity in the workplace. The SSA analyzes Medical evidence on the basis of a variety of disorders based on or related to ADHD before providing Social Security Disability Insurance, in addition to social anxiety disorder and panic disorder. The SSA also analyzes a combination of symptoms, including agoraphobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder.

ADHD can be divided into three categories or levels: in-attentional, hyperactive-impulsive, and a combined type of ADHD, one of the components is inattentive. This type of classification of the disorders is generally done through categorizing the severity of the symptoms - this simply indicates the prevalence and the severity of similar symptoms in people (whether they are more prone to inattention, restless behavior, or both) as a result of the severity of the symptoms.

This type of classification of the disorders is generally done through categorizing the severity of the symptoms - this simply indicates the prevalence and the severity of similar symptoms in people (whether they are more prone to inattention, restless behavior, or both) as a result of the severity of the symptoms.

Limitations of ADHD to qualify for SSDI

As part of its update to its neurological disorders listing, the SSA has added OCD to its extreme limitation listing under anxiety disorders. Several symptoms are common to both anxiety and OCD, according to the SSA:

  • A high level of anxiety
  • Being overly concerned
  • The feeling of fear and apprehension
  • Refraining from feeling, thinking, doing, or going somewhere
  • Restlessness
  • Focusing or concentrating is difficult
  • Increasing vigilance
  • Tension in the muscles
  • Patterns of sleep that are irregular
  • Being constantly tired/fatigued
  • Anxiety attacks or panic attacks
  • Compulsions and obsessions
  • Fear of safety and constant thoughts
  • Complaints about physical discomfort

The symptoms of ADHD are often long-term, sometimes starting in childhood, while exhaustion or anxiety can be mistaken for ADHD symptoms. Record your symptoms, severity, and effects of ADHD over time, along with ruling out other neurological conditions that could also cause these symptoms. The symptoms and severity of ADHD cannot be tested or diagnosed, so your doctor would likely note them over time. Please include all medical records, including the results of an MRI or CT scan or any treatment you've received.

To show the Social Security's examiner during the disability determination that their condition severely impairs their daily functioning, a disabled person should provide their doctor's reports, medical documentation, hospitalization records, drug prescriptions, school records (for minors), and reports from their colleagues or boss. If you believe that your symptoms affect your ability to function adaptively or cognitively, you should include any witnesses' names and phone numbers.

Applying for SSDI for ADHD for Children or Adults

There is no way to win disability benefits or cash benefits based on a simple diagnosis of ADHD by itself. There are certain limitations listed by the Social Security Administration concerning Para A and Para B below, that your disability lawyers can use to your advantage.

Para A

  • Marked hyperactivity at abnormally high levels
  • Having difficulty paying attention for a long period of time (frequent distractibility)
  • Excessive or impulsive actions

Para B

It is necessary to document the following symptoms medically:

  • Marked impairment in cognitive and communication functions; and
  • Marked or functional impairment of social functioning to an age-appropriate degree; and/or
  • It is markedly or severely difficult for the patient to perform age-appropriate personal activities.

If you or a loved one has ADHD and you meet the above requirements, you can apply for disability benefits directly through the Social Security Administration website; alternatively, you can also meet with one of our disability advocates, who will guide you through a step-by-step procedure that will greatly improve your chances of winning disability benefits for ADHD.

Applying for social security disability benefits can be an overwhelming process. If you are interested in seeking SSDI benefits, check out our article about how secondary medical conditions affect your Veterans’ Disability Benefits. To learn more, visit DisabilityHelp.org today!

Cheri Hermanson
Cheri leads our team of writers in producing the best quality content there is regarding society and disability, most especially those that helps ease the quality of life for our differently-abled loved ones.
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